Main menu

The German Enlightenment and its interpretation

Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 5:15pm
Taylor Institute, St Giles', Oxford, OX1 3NA
Room 2

The Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment and the TORCH Enlightenment Programme invite you to the 2014 Besterman Lecture: ‘ “True Enlightenment can be both achieved and beneficial” – The German Enlightenment and its interpretation’ by Joachim Whaley (Professor of German History and Thought, Cambridge), on Thursday 20 November 2014, at 5:15 pm, in Room 2, Taylor Institution, Oxford.

The reform movements associated with the Aufklärung at all levels – empire, regional structures, and territories and cities – had effects that shaped German history into the twentieth century and arguably even into the twenty-first century. Exploring these ramifications of Enlightenment in Germany is to uncover a hidden history. ‘Enlightenment can be both achieved and beneficial’, proclaimed the Brockhaus encyclopaedia in 1864. Despite everything that later happened in Germany, the conviction that Aufklärung might still be possible continued to inspire significant numbers of Germans, as it still does today.

Read more in Joachim Whaley’s blogpost.

Contact name: 
Kelsey Rubin-Detlev
Audience: 
Open to all